The Art of the GUI

HUI2When the Macintosh came along in 1984, many of us gravitated towards it over the Apple II or IBM PC largely because of its graphical user interface or GUI. The Mac’s GUI with its mouse, point, and click was much easier to use. Those of us who were not computer majors could increase our productivity while not having to learn many of the arcane intricacies needed to use a PC. The Mac’s GUI and many of its applications were carefully crafted to make a program’s use inherently apparent so that a user could become easily productive without constantly needing to read through a user manual. Indeed Mac manuals were notoriously minimal, and still are today even though applications have become much more powerful. The unfortunate thing about today’s applications are that their powerful options are no longer inherently apparent. With the zeal to create clean interfaces of today’s Apple applications the modern GUI can now be described more as “hover and discover”. A very thorough review of this situation can be read in a recent post by Don Norman and Bruce Tognazzini, both Apple alumni, who brought us the original Apple GUI and are in large part responsible for the success of the Mac. If you are at all involved in creating applications for any computer system, I encourage you to read this article recently posted on Fast Company’s website.

REVIEW: Photos for Mac and iOS: The Missing Manual

51XHpF9WPML._SX378_BO1,204,203,200_When it was first released, iPhoto was developed as an easy way to organize photos from a digital camera and consequently to print or share them. Each year Apple made improvements to this important software.

Several years later Apple released Aperture, an easy-to-use software program that was specifically designed for photographic professionals.

Last year Apple decided to replace both of these software programs with Photos that would serve the needs of both consumes and professionals.   To assist with the learning curve of this new software, Lesa Snider has written Photos for Mac and iOS: The Missing Manual (O’Reilly, July 2015, 312 pages) with a forward by David Pogue.

This book is part of The Missing Manual series from O’Reilly which gives more comprehensive information about its subject than the manual for that piece of software (or hardware). The title suggests that if you bought that digital camera or related software, you don’t have much detailed information to work with. This book will fill in the gaps. This O’Reilly book includes color photos to illustrate its points. Continue reading…